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  • UNHCR/Masciarelli
    Photo: UNHCR/Masciarelli

    Going to school was already a daily challenge for many displaced children around the world. Now there are fears some may not return after COVID-19 lockdowns lift.  One child missed two years of school while his family was avoiding social unrest in his home country of Nicaragua and then fleeing first to neighbouring Honduras, and later to Guatemala.

    At the age of eight, he finally returned to the classroom at the start of Guatemala’s school year in January. His mother, Lisseth,* said he had just started making friends when COVID-19 hit the country and the government ordered the closure of all schools.

    Even before the coronavirus pandemic shuttered schools around the world, disrupting the education of almost 1.6 billion students according to UNICEF, classrooms were closed to millions of displaced children.  UNHCR and UNICEF worked with local CSOs in Honduras and Guatemala – as well as Jordan, Kenya and Bangladesh - to provide educational opportunities.

    Similarly, following school closures in Bulgaria, refugee children initially struggled to participate in online education partly because they lacked devices, but also because of the language barrier, according to Borislav Grozdanov, a public information associate for UNHCR in Bulgaria. The Council of Refugee Women and the Bulgarian Red Cross are now providing donated laptops and tablets to refugee families and another NGO, Caritas Sofia, is offering online language courses.

    “All of my five children … are taking part in the online language courses,” said Wisam, a refugee from Syria who now lives in the Bulgarian capital. “I am very happy … they can continue practicing the language. But online courses can’t replace school. My children want to go back to school because they miss their friends and their teachers.”

    For more information see article by UNHCR staff.

    UNHCR and UNICEF – Learning during COVID-19
    UNHCR and UNICEF – Learning during COVID-19
  • UNICEF/Madagascar
    Photo: UNICEF/Madagascar

    UNPP has helped UNICEF in the Analamanga and Boeny regions of Madagascar, working with local partners at a specialised center for boys who have committed petty offenses. UNICEF with partners on the ground have sponsored a life skills program, supported with Danish Telethon funds, during which the young residents have the opportunity to work with peer educators.

    “When I first entered the centre, we considered ourselves prisoners. We follow orders. But the young peer educators listen to us,” said Fanantenana. “When I leave the centre, my dream is to go back to school and live a life far from the drugs and violence of life on the street.”

    According to the center’s director, children who take part in the life skills sessions are less violent and show greater respect to one another. “The life skills sessions and the peer approach used to engage with the boys have had a real impact. The boys feel more accepted and have greater aspirations for their lives,” he said.

    Thanks to Danish Telethon funds, extremely vulnerable adolescents in Analamanga and Boeny regions can benefit from the national life skills programme which aims to give adolescent girls and boys the knowledge and skills to deal with the challenges they face in life, create harmonious relationships between boys and girls, and to live more peacefully in their communities.

    See the full UNICEF article by Karim Hamed

    Over 16 interactive and entertaining sessions they benefit from guidance to improve their self-esteem, create peaceful relationships with others, and learn about a range of topics including gender equality and positive masculinity, sexual and reproductive health and substance abuse.

    These topics have particularly interested many of them as they are closely related to their previous life on the streets. In addition to the life skills programme, UNICEF also supports activities and improved living conditions in the centre through an NGO partner Grandir Dignement (Twitter: @GrandirD).

    Life Skills for Children in Conflict in Madagascar
    Life Skills for Children in Conflict in Madagascar
  • WFP
    Photo: WFP

    Two organizations, Congo Handicap (CH) and the Community Association for Development (ACDD) have joined forces to create a CH-ACDD Consortium, with achievements allowing them to apply for a project in 2019.

    The analysis of the projects at three levels made it possible to identify the strengths and the risk analysis for each applicant. The consortium of two small organizations was ranked second on the basis of the score obtained.

    The consortium was selected as the second implementing partner for the Targeting and registration of beneficiaries in South Kivu.

    To date, this Consortium, which has already signed 4 Field-level Agreements (FLAs) with the WFP (including 1 in 2020 and 3 in 2021) has gone through the transparent and objective process to arrive at being verified as an organization capable of collaborating with the WFP for the implementation of projects.

    Without the UNPP these NGOs would not have the opportunity to promote and expose themselves as a viable and credible structure. UNPP helps small organizations build their organizational and operational capacities.

    So the UN Partner Portal is, so far, the only platform that also allows small organizations to compete with large organizations in the development area.

    According to the Director of the CH-ACDD Consortium: “The CH-ACDD Consortium is a National NGO formed and registered on the UN Partner Portal (UNPP) since 2019, and can only confirm its joy at having already had 6 positive responses from its applications of which 4 have already resulted in signed FLA / funded partnerships.”

    This satisfactory result for the consortium, which is on its first contracts with a United Nations Agency, is proof of the efficiency and transparency that the UNPP has brought. Once registered, the steps to are straightforward and understandable.

    WFP Welcomes DRC CSO Consortium on Disabilities
    WFP Welcomes DRC CSO Consortium on Disabilities

All news

  • UNHCR/Masciarelli
    Photo: UNHCR/Masciarelli

    Going to school was already a daily challenge for many displaced children around the world. Now there are fears some may not return after COVID-19 lockdowns lift.  One child missed two years of school while his family was avoiding social unrest in his home country of Nicaragua and then fleeing first to neighbouring Honduras, and later to Guatemala.

    At the age of eight, he finally returned to the classroom at the start of Guatemala’s school year in January. His mother, Lisseth,* said he had just started making friends when COVID-19 hit the country and the government ordered the closure of all schools.

    Even before the coronavirus pandemic shuttered schools around the world, disrupting the education of almost 1.6 billion students according to UNICEF, classrooms were closed to millions of displaced children.  UNHCR and UNICEF worked with local CSOs in Honduras and Guatemala – as well as Jordan, Kenya and Bangladesh - to provide educational opportunities.

    Similarly, following school closures in Bulgaria, refugee children initially struggled to participate in online education partly because they lacked devices, but also because of the language barrier, according to Borislav Grozdanov, a public information associate for UNHCR in Bulgaria. The Council of Refugee Women and the Bulgarian Red Cross are now providing donated laptops and tablets to refugee families and another NGO, Caritas Sofia, is offering online language courses.

    “All of my five children … are taking part in the online language courses,” said Wisam, a refugee from Syria who now lives in the Bulgarian capital. “I am very happy … they can continue practicing the language. But online courses can’t replace school. My children want to go back to school because they miss their friends and their teachers.”

    For more information see article by UNHCR staff.

    UNHCR and UNICEF – Learning during COVID-19
    UNHCR and UNICEF – Learning during COVID-19
  • UNICEF/Madagascar
    Photo: UNICEF/Madagascar

    UNPP has helped UNICEF in the Analamanga and Boeny regions of Madagascar, working with local partners at a specialised center for boys who have committed petty offenses. UNICEF with partners on the ground have sponsored a life skills program, supported with Danish Telethon funds, during which the young residents have the opportunity to work with peer educators.

    “When I first entered the centre, we considered ourselves prisoners. We follow orders. But the young peer educators listen to us,” said Fanantenana. “When I leave the centre, my dream is to go back to school and live a life far from the drugs and violence of life on the street.”

    According to the center’s director, children who take part in the life skills sessions are less violent and show greater respect to one another. “The life skills sessions and the peer approach used to engage with the boys have had a real impact. The boys feel more accepted and have greater aspirations for their lives,” he said.

    Thanks to Danish Telethon funds, extremely vulnerable adolescents in Analamanga and Boeny regions can benefit from the national life skills programme which aims to give adolescent girls and boys the knowledge and skills to deal with the challenges they face in life, create harmonious relationships between boys and girls, and to live more peacefully in their communities.

    See the full UNICEF article by Karim Hamed

    Over 16 interactive and entertaining sessions they benefit from guidance to improve their self-esteem, create peaceful relationships with others, and learn about a range of topics including gender equality and positive masculinity, sexual and reproductive health and substance abuse.

    These topics have particularly interested many of them as they are closely related to their previous life on the streets. In addition to the life skills programme, UNICEF also supports activities and improved living conditions in the centre through an NGO partner Grandir Dignement (Twitter: @GrandirD).

    Life Skills for Children in Conflict in Madagascar
    Life Skills for Children in Conflict in Madagascar
  • WFP
    Photo: WFP

    Two organizations, Congo Handicap (CH) and the Community Association for Development (ACDD) have joined forces to create a CH-ACDD Consortium, with achievements allowing them to apply for a project in 2019.

    The analysis of the projects at three levels made it possible to identify the strengths and the risk analysis for each applicant. The consortium of two small organizations was ranked second on the basis of the score obtained.

    The consortium was selected as the second implementing partner for the Targeting and registration of beneficiaries in South Kivu.

    To date, this Consortium, which has already signed 4 Field-level Agreements (FLAs) with the WFP (including 1 in 2020 and 3 in 2021) has gone through the transparent and objective process to arrive at being verified as an organization capable of collaborating with the WFP for the implementation of projects.

    Without the UNPP these NGOs would not have the opportunity to promote and expose themselves as a viable and credible structure. UNPP helps small organizations build their organizational and operational capacities.

    So the UN Partner Portal is, so far, the only platform that also allows small organizations to compete with large organizations in the development area.

    According to the Director of the CH-ACDD Consortium: “The CH-ACDD Consortium is a National NGO formed and registered on the UN Partner Portal (UNPP) since 2019, and can only confirm its joy at having already had 6 positive responses from its applications of which 4 have already resulted in signed FLA / funded partnerships.”

    This satisfactory result for the consortium, which is on its first contracts with a United Nations Agency, is proof of the efficiency and transparency that the UNPP has brought. Once registered, the steps to are straightforward and understandable.

    WFP Welcomes DRC CSO Consortium on Disabilities
    WFP Welcomes DRC CSO Consortium on Disabilities
  • UNICEF Indonesia
    Photo: UNICEF Indonesia

    UNICEF is striving to address the needs of children and families affected by the global pandemic, and the power of partnerships is more important than ever. In Indonesia, UNICEF is working with both international and local civil society partners such as Yayasan Setara to address the critical needs of vulnerable children and communities.

    With the world's fourth largest child population of 80 million children, UNICEF's involvement in Indonesia has expanded over the years thanks to partnerships with civil society. UNICEF with CSOs have been part of the first responders that have helped to rapidly mobilise resources during the COVID pandemic to reach more communities throughout the country.

    In 2021, UNICEF together with the Setara Foundation are running several programs including the SAFE4C (Safe and Friendly Environment for Children) Program, PKSAI (Integrative Child Social Welfare Center), ROOTS (Building Prevention Program), and Positive Discipline.

    We distributed personal protective equipment to 35 city districts, including cities with integrated child welfare services. We also held online activities for children on Covid-19 prevention and other life skill programmes. Hidayatul Soleha, Programme Coordinator Yayasan Setara (UNICEF Partner)

    Partnerships with civil society are not just making a difference in Indonesia, the same stories are being repeated in other countries. Every year, UNICEF partners with over 4000 civil society organisations in 190 countries delivering life saving aid to children and vulnerable groups. We're also harnessing technological resources to increase the effectiveness of our partnerships with civil society.

    UNICEF has also introduced a partner reporting portal, which is helping to simplify reporting processes and enable both civil society partners and UNICEF offices to effectively track the results of programme partnerships.

    UNICEF Indonesia COVID-19 Partnerships
    UNICEF Indonesia COVID-19 Partnerships
  • UNICEF/Emad
    Photo: UNICEF/Emad

    UNICEF in collaboration with CARE, has established a Learning Hub in the Agami district, located on the outskirts of Alexandria, Egypt’s second largest city.

    Twenty kilometers west of Alexandria lies the child-friendly space located in the midst of 6th of October village which became a popular destination for Syrian refugees.

    We need to come together and explore every avenue to keep children learning and help them through this difficult time. With such initiatives like the learning hub, we are able to swiftly deploy innovative, scalable solutions for children and youth.
    Fazlul Haque, UNICEF Deputy Representative, Egypt

     

    The Learning Hub serves the most vulnerable children, particularly those from the refugee communities in the surrounding area, as it provides continuous access to education and learning during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    In the Learning Hub, students can access various online learning platforms provided by UNICEF such as the Learning Passport as well as those from the Ministry of Education and Technical Education.

    The Learning Passport is an online learning platform that was launched by UNICEF earlier this year to provide interactive learning opportunities. This platform encompasses learning materials for children, teachers, and parents. Content available to school children includes online textbooks, videos as well as support for parents of children with learning disabilities.

    The Learning Hub provides teachers with equipment to record educational lessons in the form of podcasts or YouTube videos, which are uploaded to Learning Passport or shared with students via WhatsApp, supporting their learning and exam preparation.

    See the full UNICEF article by Karim Hamed.

    UNICEF and CARE Launch Learning Platform in Egypt
    UNICEF and CARE Launch Learning Platform in Egypt